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Burmese-Style Pork Curry with Fresh Ginger
Oct 1st, 2004

After the chicken curry, our spice week adventures took a turn to Southeast Asia. This recipe is a variation on a Northern Thai dish called gaeng hahng ley, which in turn was borrowed from the Burmese. It calls for country-style pork ribs, which I believe come from the area close to the shoulder and may or may not include bones. This recipe calls for boneless. You can find country-style ribs that come from the loin or from the shoulder, the shoulder cut is usually cheaper and a bit fattier. That's what I had on hand, and I think the dish probably would be better with the slightly leaner cut. But dang, it's a cheap meal with the shoulder country ribs.

As with most Thai curries, this goes well with Jasmine rice. Some mango tossed in lime juice would be an excellent dessert.


Burmese-Style Pork Curry with Fresh Ginger

1/4 cup peeled, slivered fresh ginger [leave fairly large
so it's easily avoidable in the finished dish]
1 1/2 pounds boneless country-style pork ribs
2 tbsp red curry paste
1/4 cup light or dark brown sugar
2 1/2 cups water
2 tsp ground turmeric
1 tsp dark soy sauce or 2 tsp regular soy sauce
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup thinly sliced shallots
2 tbsp minced garlic
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice


Place the slivered ginger in a small bowl, add warm water to cover and set aside. Cut the pork into 1-inch chunks.

Combine the pork, curry paste and brown sugar in a heavy 6-quart saucepan or Dutch oven. Stir to combine the curry paste and sugar, and coat the pork with the mixture. Place the pan over medium heat and cook for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the pork browns slightly and renders some of its fat.

In a large measuring cup, stir together the water, turmeric, soy sauce, and salt, and pour over the pork. Bring to a rolling boil and lower the heat to maintain a simmer. Cook, uncovered, until the meat is tender and
the sauce has cooked down somewhat and thickened, 45 to 50 minutes.

Add the ginger with its soaking liquid, along with the shallots, garlic, and lime juice. Continue cooking for 5 more minutes. Taste the sauce: it should have a pleasing balance of flavor - salty, sour, and sweet. Adjust by adding more salt, lime juice, or sugar, if needed. Serve hot or warm.

Reheats well.

-Nancie McDermott, The Curry Book
Print Recipe

Comments

Kymm, all your recipes sound delicious but the pork curry sounds so good it might drive me to cook--unless you can fedex some here....
2 ignorant questions:
How do you get boneless ribs? (isn't the rib a bone?)
What's a dutch oven?

-posted by Hetal on Mar 13th, 2006
Yes, that whole ribs without bones thing stymied me too. Apparently the answer is that "country ribs" aren't really ribs like we think of them. The cut comes from the shoulder and may include some bones from the top of the rib bones, but they'll be kind of randomly interspersed throughout the meat rather than in tidy little rows. The meat is cut into strips though, so it's rib shaped.

A dutch oven is basically a big pot or kettle. Traditionally they're made out of cast iron and have a tight fitting lid so they're good for slow cooking and they can go from the stovetop to the oven if necessary. I just use my big pot that I use for pasta and soup. As long as it is fairly heavy bottomed so your food won't scorch it's all good.

I'll look into the fedex thing...

-posted by Kymm on Mar 13th, 2006
yum yum yummy.

THanks Kymm.

-posted by Hetal on Mar 13th, 2006
© 2006, Kimberly Cooperrider | kymmco@excite.com